To Stand Upon the Altar of God / Best Ways to Praise / Friday: Main Event

The World
if filled with Beauty.
And all because
of YOU.

The Beauty of this Earth
would not exist
without
God’s Love for
YOU.

Yes.
It is here
for you.

It is
a simple fact
of physics,
that nothing exists
without an observer.

The Beauty
of this Earth
is truly
a Gift from God.
Open your eyes
and enjoy
an adventure with
Nature.

He
created you
to Love.
And His expressions
of LOVE
abound all around.

Breathe deeply,
and walk as far
as you can
in Love.
Venture into
the vast and Beautiful
wilderness
of the Mind
of God.

To stand
upon this Earth,
is to stand
upon the Altar
of God.
And this Earth,
in all its abundant
Natural Beauty,
is God’s expression
of His Love
for YOU,
His Child.

“For it is God
who works in you,
both to will and to work
for His good pleasure.”

Philippians 2:13

My Dear Friends,
God
Created YOU
for a reason:
to Love you,
to surround you
with Beauty.

“In all your ways acknowledge Him,
And He will make your paths straight.”
Proverbs 3:6

If
your intention
is to see
all the Beauty that exists,
in YOU,
in your World,
in each other,
then you shall
see it.

Look
for the Beauty.
It is here.
It is there.
It is
everywhere.
It is in you.
It is
YOU.

“See what great Love
the Father has lavished on us,
that we should be called
children of God!
And that is what we are!”
John 3:1

What is
Sacred
is ALL so
Beautiful,
far, far more
than we shall
every know.

There is great
Beauty
that resides
in the Word of God.
His Truth
is far more Beautiful
than anything
we can envision.
And,
His Truth
is in you.
For YOU
are His beloved.
And
there is no greater
Love.

My Friends,
Love
is the Ultimate Truth.
And God’s Love
for you
is Beauty beyond
our comprehension.
It is
brighter than the
Sun.
It dances
upon the Waters
of our Faith.
It sparkles
in the darkness
of our fears.

We
are beloved
of God,
and of each other,
and shall
by the Grace of our Father,
Love each other
and Live forever
in the Warm Embrace
of God,
and each other.

Our LOVE,
not only unites
us,
it is us.
Our lives
are intertwined:
mine and yours,
yours and mine.
They are ours,
not yours
and mine.

“No man is an island,
entire of itself;
every man
is a piece of the continent,
a part of the main.”
– John Donne

We
do not live Life
ourselves.
We live Life
through
the lives of others,
and by the will
of those around
us.

When
you live inside
the Heart
of another,
you become
real.
And those few
precious moments
become
the only moments
that are real.

                  Infinite possibilities.

In every
moment
that are infinite
possibilities
for the future.

Goodnight.

The 10 Best Ways to Praise

Parents Magazine
read more
.
  1. Don’t overdo it. When your toddler puts his pants on by himself for the first time, it’s worth making a big deal about it. But gushing over everyday achievements (“You finished your carrots — yay!”) will cause your child to discount praise he’s truly earned. It may also make him feel he constantly has to do things to impress you.
    .
  2. Be specific. Instead of saying, “Wow, that’s a great drawing,” say, “Look at that great sun you made, and you even included clouds!” This lets your child know you’re really taking notice of her work and encourages her to do more, says Janice Fletcher, EdD, director of the child development lab at the University of Idaho in Moscow.
    .
  3. Emphasize the effort, not the outcome. When your child is learning a new activity, don’t comment on how well she does it. Instead, compliment her enthusiasm and progress (“You worked really hard in soccer, and I noticed you’re starting to dribble the ball better”). When 7-year-old Rachel Geissler started a dance class, she had trouble mastering the steps. “I told her I liked her bright smile, which showed how passionate she is about dancing,” says her mother, Andrea, of Bel Air, Maryland. “And I said, ‘You really give your all.’ That helped her stick with it.”
    .
  4. Focus on the feat. Young kids have a hard time distinguishing between who they are and what they do. So instead of commending your child (“You were good in the car”), praise the action (“You were very calm and quiet on the trip”). This helps toddlers and preschoolers understand the behavior that earned them a compliment.
    .
  5. Point out the positives. It’s easy to fall into the pattern of pointing out your child’s mistakes while overlooking his little successes, says Hartley-Brewer. But when you make an extra effort to praise your child’s achievements and good behavior, you’ll help reinforce them. When Ginny Speirs notices that her children, Ben, 5, and Siena, 8, are being kind to a younger child, she lets them know it. “Telling them that they should be proud of themselves inspires them to do the same thing again,” says the mom from Montecito, California.
    .
  6. Don’t brag. Overdoing praise in public (“Isn’t Jimmy the best speller you’ve ever seen?” or “My 4-year-old already knows how to count to 20 and to read”) isn’t just annoying to other parents — it also puts a lot of pressure on your child to perform. “This is counterproductive praising,” says Edward Christophersen, PhD, clinical child psychologist at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. “It can embarrass your child, and it cancels out the learning benefit of praise.”
    .
  7. Share his achievements with your spouse. While you shouldn’t boast about your child in front of your friends, there’s no need to hold back when you’re at home. In fact, making your spouse aware of your child’s achievement can be good for him, says Lawrence Balter, PhD, professor of applied psychology at New York University, in New York City. Just try not to say it in front of your other kids, so they don’t feel slighted. “When my 5-year-old son, Jacques, does something noteworthy, I tell his mother about it in front of him,” says Todd Nissen, of Washington, D.C. One day when Jacques was sniffling, Nissen handed Jacques a tissue and told his wife, “He blew his nose all by himself yesterday.” Right on cue, Jacques said, “Yeah, watch me,” and demonstrated his new skill.
    .
  8. Tell the truth. Even young kids can see right through false praise. Your best strategy is to be honest — and diplomatic — when commenting on your child’s ability. “If she’s learning to dive and does an awkward belly flop, don’t say, ‘What a beautiful dive,'” says Miller Shivers, PhD, clinical child psychologist at Children’s Memorial Hospital, in Chicago. A better script: “I see you’re working on your diving.” By not defining the action as good or bad, you’re being truthful — while letting your child know she has your attention.
    .
  9. Use body language. Nonverbal cues are a great way to express your approval. “When my face lights up with a grin or I high-five my 4-year-old twins for cleaning their room, they know how I feel about their accomplishment,” says Daphne Butler, of Nashville. A smile or a hug can also be less distracting than words. “If you say, ‘You’re reading so well,’ your child will stop to look up at you,” says Dr. Christophersen. “But if you give him a gentle rub on the back, he’ll get the message that you’re proud of him and keep reading.”
    .
  10. Avoid sarcasm. Don’t poison praise with snarky comments (“Who would have guessed you’d finish an entire meal without staining your clothes?” or “Finally, you learned to ride a bike without training wheels”). Children may not get your attempt at humor, and pointing out past failings is really a form of criticism. Simply celebrate the event (“How does it feel to eat neatly, like a big boy?” or “I’ll bet you can’t wait to show your friends that you can ride a bike”). “Kids just need to know what it is they’re doing right,” says Hartley-Brewer.

Rephrase Your Praise

Toddlers

Instead of saying: “You were a good boy.”

Say: “You shared nicely with your friend.”

Preschoolers

Instead of saying: “You cleaned up your toys.”

Say: “I noticed that you put away your blocks without being asked.”

Big Kids

Instead of saying: “I love your handwriting!”

Say: “It must feel good to be able to write your thank-you notes so neatly.”

Any Child

Instead of saying: “I’m proud of you.”

Say: “You must feel proud of yourself.”

Parents Magazine

In Philosophy this week:

2018-19 Anderson School Calendar

First Semester

September 4 – December 21   2018

Sept. 4 (Tuesday)                              First Day of First Semester

Oct 8 (Monday)                                 Columbus Day Holiday

Nov. 19 – 23                                       Thanksgiving / Fall Break

T. B. A.                                                 Texas A.G.T. Conference (no school)

Dec. 21 (Friday)                                 Last Day of Fall Semester

Dec. 24 – Jan. 7                                  Winter Break Holidays

Second Semester

January 8 – May 24   2019

Jan. 8 (Tuesday)                                 Second Semester begins

Jan. 21 (Monday)                               Rev. Dr. Martin L. King Holiday

Feb. 18 (Monday)                               President’s Day Holiday

Mar. 11 -15                                         Spring Break Holidays

April 19 & 22 (Fri. & Mon.)             Good Friday & Easter Holidays

May 20                                                Prep. Day for Adventure Trip     (no school)

May 21 – 24                                        Adventure Trip

May 24                                                Last Day of Semester

  Dr. & Mrs. Anderson may schedule 2-5 additional days
(to be announced later) for In-service Training.
Visit our website at
http://www.andersonschool.net
for updated information.

    The School Calendar is subject to change.
There are no make-up days
if school is closed due to
 inclement weather.

Inclement Weather Policy:
the school will close if Fort Worth I. S. D. is closed.

(Calendar 2018-2019 / approved 7-29-18)

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