Into the Rare / A World Without Cancer: Is Prevention the Cure? / Friday: at School (Shakespeare)

Out of the common place.
Into the rare.
How we ascend
from where,
in dark despair,
we are placed
in harm’s way,
can become
a Miraculous moment,
a truly Sacred day.

For
when we Pray,
the Song our Heart sings,
is music
to the Mind of God.
Yes,
my Friend,
He is listening,
patiently awaiting
the sound of your
Heart,
to beat in time
with His.

   A Miraculous moment, a truly Sacred day.

As I survey
all that I see,
I am finally free.
The Presence that surrounds me,
Magnificent and Beautiful to behold,
if the Truth be told,
is the Existence of God.
He enters all that you are,
is all you can be.
Let Him lift you up,
from where you are,
to Horizons
only now
you will see.

“Oh Lord, my God
When I in awesome wonder

Considered all the worlds
Thy Hands have made.

I see the stars, I hear the rolling thunder
Thy art throughout the Universe displayed.
Then sings my Soul,
my Savior God to Thee

“How great Thou art,
how great Thou art!”
Carl G. Boberg / Stuart K. Hine

Enveloped
by the Perpetual Light of Love,
Absolute Beauty
in its purest Perfection,
YOU
become One
with all the cherished
Reborn.

And
suffering and sorrow
need be no more.

  The Perpetual Light of Love.

God’s Purpose
can be revealed,
not to you –
but to your Heart,
in the warmth
of His Glorious Light,
the Light
of His Precious Love.

Let our Father
keep you safe
in the warmth
of His Loving Embrace,
and fill your precious Soul
with His Abundant
Grace.

Trust in Him.

Let anguish and hate
vanish like shadows at
dawn.
Do not wait
until you perish,
to rest in Peace
and feel Embraced
by Love
Pure and Chaste.

            Like shadows at dawn.

The innocence
of your Heart
need not
be slain by the blindness
of the night,
from never knowing
what is good,
what is right.
From all that’s dark,
peals out an Everlasting Song.
For in the dark and bitter cold
of things,
one can always hear
a song that someone sings.
This Song
is a Sacred Thing,
Born of Colors
in Rainbow rings,
clear
and penetrating
like the Robin sings.

The journey
to God in Prayer
is Glorious & exciting.
Cast your lonely eyes
to Heaven Above.
I invite you on this Journey.
Let your Prayers
float up to Heaven,
surrounded by Angels
singing in Paradise.

   The warmth of His Glorious Light.

Rejoice.

Meet
yourself
along the Way.
And as you journey
the road of Life,
know the end of that road
is nearer than ever.
Find Peace
in knowing the Song
your Life sings
can put your mind to rest,
make you at ease.

“O what Peace we often forfeit,
O what needless pain we bear,
All because we do not carry
Everything to God
in Prayer.”

Joseph M. Scriven
In 1855 he wrote a poem called
“Pray Without Ceasing” to comfort his ailing mother.
This poem was later set to music by
Charles Coverse and retitled
“What a Friend We Have in Jesus.”

May the Perpetual Light
of God’s Love
Shine upon you.
Rest In Peace,
until
you Rest in
Peace.

Goodnight.

 Magnificent and Beautiful to behold.

A World Without Cancer: Is Prevention the Cure?
read more

Author

Max Macaluso

Max is the Technology, Biopharma & Health Care Bureau Chief at Fool.com. Prior to joining the Fool, he completed a PhD in chemistry at the University of Cambridge and an MBA at the College des Ingenieurs.

In the following interview, Dr. Margaret I. Cuomo, author of the book       A World Without Cancer, discusses the importance of cancer prevention with Motley Fool health care analyst Max Macaluso.

Macaluso: Dr. Cuomo is the author of the new book, A World Without Cancer, and she’s also the daughter of our former Governor Cuomo, and the sister of our current Governor Cuomo.

It’s been about 40 years – actually more than 40 years – since 1971, when the war on cancer was declared by President Richard Nixon. In that time, we’ve spent over $90 billion on cancer research, and yet we are still seeing cancer incidence rates rise.

We haven’t come as far as you’d think we should have, for that amount of time and money spent, so I said to myself, with all the horrific effects of cancer on the lives of my patients, friends, and family, it was time to delve into the subject and give it a fresh perspective.

Macaluso: In your book you talk a lot about the misconceptions of cancer prevention. What do you think the top misconception is today?

Cuomo: I think most people, even people who are quite knowledgeable, think that cancer is an inevitability. “No matter what I do, I’m going to get cancer. Either I’ll inherit it, or I’ll grow old enough and I’ll get cancer just because I’ve grown old.”

That’s clearly not the case. We know that over 50% of all cancers are preventable. Attention to diet, exercise, limiting alcohol, ending smoking, protecting our skin from the sun, and taking vitamin D all contribute to a cancer-free life and the environmental toxins that are in our midst can be eliminated, or at least limited so that they don’t raise our risk of cancer.

Macaluso: What are some of the specific things we’re not paying enough attention to when it comes to prevention? Let’s start with diet.

Cuomo: OK, diet. You know the old expression, “You are what you eat.” To a large extent, that’s very true. A plant-based diet is what nearly all the experts say is not only the healthiest in terms of preventing heart disease and diabetes, but also reducing our risk for cancer.

If you look at your plate, your daily plate, two-thirds of it should be fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains like brown rice or quinoa, or even a whole grain pasta – and then a very small amount of lean protein like fish or chicken, and a minimal amount of red meat. That is the cancer prevention diet, but it also, as I say, decreases your risk for heart disease and diabetes.

Limiting alcohol – that means you really can’t afford to go out once a week and binge. They say no more than one drink a day of alcohol – that includes wine – for a woman and no more than two for a man, and it may be even less than that, but certainly you want to watch your alcohol intake.

Macaluso: I can tell you, after reading your book I definitely modified my diet. I’m drinking more green tea and a lot more vegetables.

Cuomo: Excellent. Green tea has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects.

Macaluso: Let’s shift the discussion from diet to environmental factors.

Cuomo: Yes, environment; very important. In fact, the United Nations just issued a report last week, that the World Health Organization was involved in as well, in which it said that there are so many of the so-called “endocrine disrupting chemicals,” such as BPA, which are in our plastic water bottles, other beverages, also food containers, the lining of the cans of food, soup – a can of soup, a can of beans – etc. Even a cashier receipt can have BPA.

Parabens – are in everything from facial wash to shampoo, toothpaste – these are endocrine-disrupting chemicals. What does that mean?

That means they modify the development of hormones in our body. They affect our endocrine system, which has been linked to cancers of the breast, prostate, thyroid, and others. Also linked to obesity and diabetes, and they even drew a link to autism.

For all those reasons we want to rid our products, our personal care products at the very least, of these harmful chemicals, so there is good news on that note.

Macaluso: In your book, you talk a lot about BPAs and all the things in consumer packaging. I understand that Johnson & Johnson is leading the charge in making a commitment to rid their products of these chemicals. Can you speak a little bit about that?

Cuomo: Yes. I applaud Johnson & Johnson. They are the first major consumer products company in the United States to voluntarily commit to removing all harmful chemicals from their personal care products.

I would like to see other major companies, like Procter & Gamble and Colgate and L’Oreal follow the good example of Johnson & Johnson. Why should consumers be at risk for washing their face or brushing their teeth?

Macaluso: Excellent point. Going along with that, are there any other companies focused on organic products or specific foods,  that you might applaud?

Cuomo: Yes. I am happy to share with you, in terms of being BPA-free in all of their food packaging materials, the Hain Celestial Group. First of all, they’re the market leader in organic products, I’ve learned, and they include products such as Arrowhead Mills, Health Valley, Earth’s Best baby food, Walnut Acres juices, DeBoles pasta, Imagine sauces and soups.

They have made a commitment to BPA-free in all of their food packaging, cans, etc., and they also are very conscious in terms of sustainability for their packaging materials, so big applause for Hain Celestial Group.

Also, Whole Foods 365 brands, many of their brands are BPA-free, Trader Joe’s, and Eden Foods are some that come to mind.

Macaluso: Is there anything that consumers can do, or do we just have to wait for these companies to change their practices?

Cuomo: What you can do as an educated consumer is to read the labels. Certainly, if you don’t see “BPA free,” you have to question, “Does this packaging material contain BPA?”

In terms of your personal care products, read the labels. If you see anything with “paraben” in it – that means methylparaben, butylparaben – anything that has that phrase, “paraben,” avoid it completely. Also another word, difficult to pronounce, phthalates, another endocrine disruptor.

Basically, Max, anything you can’t pronounce you would be wise to stay away from it.

Macaluso: Yeah, I think that’s a good rule of thumb. Let’s talk a little bit about obesity. I think a lot of people might not realize that obesity is linked to certain types of cancers.

Cuomo: Yes. Obesity is linked to quite a few cancers. Scientists have pointed to the fact that breast cancer and colon cancer are definitely linked to obesity, but there are many other cancers that are as well.

What do we want to do? How do we avoid this epidemic? Do you realize, in the past 30 years the rate of obesity among children has tripled, and it has doubled for adults? Everyone agrees we have an epidemic. What do we do about it?

It’s all about education, isn’t it? We have to start with our very youngest children, teaching them what is a healthful diet. It’s not a bag of chips at every meal. It’s not a can of soda at every meal. If children don’t have the tools, the strategies, how can we expect them to eat healthfully?

Often times, what children learn in school in terms of vegetables and a plant-based diet, they will take home and they will be the teachers for their parents and caregivers. Isn’t that a wonderful thing?

I really feel education is the key here.

Macaluso: Once again, focused more on prevention than treatments.

Cuomo: Prevention is so important.

Macaluso: Let’s talk about tobacco products a little bit. Not all smokers get lung cancer, but it is a major risk factor.

Cuomo: Tobacco is a scourge and as you say, certainly we’ve proven that it causes lung cancer but it causes many other cancers as well; cancers of the digestive tract, even pancreas and bladder, have been linked to smoking.

What do we do? Well, years ago there was something called the Master Settlement Agreement, where all of the tobacco companies agreed to contribute billions of dollars to a fund that would later be given to the states with the intention that those funds be used for tobacco cessation programs and other tobacco elimination programs.

However, as I understand it the law is that the money goes to the states, but the states are not compelled to use it for that purpose. In these economically trying times, states are using it for infrastructure, they’re using it for a lot of other reasons.

We have to get back to preserving that money for tobacco cessation. Right now we have an increasing trend in smoking among adolescents, and among people of low education and low income.

Again, the burden of their illnesses is going to impact all of us. It doesn’t only impact the person who is going to be unfortunate enough to get lung cancer; it affects our health care costs, and we all absorb that, so it behooves all of us to make sure those funds are used properly.

Macaluso: Let’s shift the conversation from prevention to treatment. Your book does talk about some major successes in medicine, in the treatment of cancer. One in particular is Novartis’ Gleevec. This is a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia.

What I was wondering, reading your book, was why haven’t we been able to replicate the success of Gleevec and chronic myeloid leukemia with other types of cancer, namely solid tumors?

Cuomo: That’s a very astute question. Chronic myeloid or myelogenous leukemia, CML, is based on a single genetic mutation. This terrible disease is actually a very simple disease, unlike breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer – these more common cancers – which are several orders of magnitude more complicated than that.

Therefore, Gleevec can attack CML and effectively cure it because it’s a very simple disease. Breast, prostate, lung cancer, are all much more complicated and it’s not as easy to treat them with a single chemotherapeutic agent or a monoclonal antibody, and that’s what Gleevec is.

Cuomo: prevention is the most effective strategy we have for ridding ourselves of cancer, and yet we devote so little time and attention to it.

My agenda is not to draw attention away from treatment. Again, there will always be patients who require treatment, and they should have it. What I am saying is that we have the intellectual resources and the financial capability to achieve both.

The National Cancer Prevention Institute would do just that. It would be based on a collaborative focused effort divided into teams, each team addressing a specific cancer type, and it would draw from many disciplines.

It would be a trans-disciplinary approach, including epidemiology, cancer biology, microbiology, immunology, engineering, pharmaceuticals, even urban planning; everything you need to decrease cancer incidence.

I don’t see that happening right now, and a lot of people that have been studying this for a long time feel it is time now to do this kind of approach, the way we did for the moonshot and for the Human Genome Project, both of which took a collaborative effort which had team science at its core. That’s what we should use for the prevention of cancer.

Macaluso: Dr. Cuomo, recently there was an Institute of Medicine report that addressed cancer care. Can you speak a little bit about that?

Cuomo: Yes. I was very pleased to see some experts in the country, such as Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, Dr. Peter Bach, contribute to this workshop last October. They just issued a report from the Institute of Medicine addressing the question, “How do we contain cancer costs and what can we be doing better?”

Some of the key points were, what should a cancer therapy do? How do we assess its effectiveness and its value?

Well, it should increase our overall survival. It should increase the patient’s survival. It should increase the patient’s quality of life, while at the same time it should have very few side effects – certainly not life-threatening side effects or side effects that degrade that quality of life – and it should contain costs. It should not be an unsustainable cost.

I thought that was a very good way of focusing attention on the question of how do we end the spiral of cancer care cost in America.

Macaluso: Thank you very much. Once again, Dr. Margaret Cuomo, author of the book A World Without Cancer.

IMPORTANT  DATES:
May 12 (Friday)   At School all day (preparation for Shakespeare Play)

May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 17 Tuesday  –  NO SCHOOL – a day of rest for a job well done!

May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

Lyrics/song texts are property and copyright of their owners and provided for educational purposes.

       Horizons only now you will see.

Love Surrounds Us / Heart Healthy Diet / Friday: At School

The Miracle of Life blossoms into Beauty.

Thoughts of love
surround us.
And all around us,
in every moment
of every day,
with every beat
of every Heart,
the Miracle of Life
blossoms
into Beauty that
WE
can behold.

The Eternal Light
of Love

chases away the last vestige
of the dark
of night.

And we come to see
evermore,
the wonder of our Birth
into Hope,
into Love
and Life,
and into the
Light.

All
things become visible

when they are exposed by the Light,
for everything that becomes visible
is Light.”
Ephesians 5:13

We are remote
from the possibility
of comprehension.
But the Human Heart
can
take pleasure and delight

in the magic and the wonder
and the mystery
that is this
Life.

               A Many Splendored Thing.

Life
is at best,
but a brief journey
through Seasons
that come and go,
the passage
through which
few
are ever fully aware,
ever really know.

Yes.
Seasons come
and then they go,
and we are here

and gone.
Your smile,

faint in the glow
of beautiful memory,
much like
your Life,
seemingly long,
glimmering like a Rainbow,
but lasting
like the Dawn.

             Glimmering like a Rainbow.

But the Miracle
of this Life
lies in the Mystery
of the Clear Eternal Light,
that when you Pray,
will find you
and guide you,
and never
let you lose
your way.

“This is the message
we have heard from him
and proclaim to you,

that God is light
and in him is no darkness
at all.”

John 1:5

Let us
Dream the Dream,
and keep on
Living
to Walk
in the Beautiful
Light of God’s
abundant Love.

                      Lasting like the Dawn.

 Yes,
the tides of fortune
are awash and aplenty
upon our shores.
And the initial Life
of material existence
is filled with illusion.

“Our concept of Beauty
suggests a greater Meaning
in a Universe capable of producing beings
that not only appreciate Beauty
but strive to achieve greater and greater Beauty.
You are made to think, know, and create like God,
because God wanted to share
that experience of Being
with some other than Himself.”
Sarah Capello

But deeper
than the Ocean
is God’s Love
for you.

I Pray
you will come to see
the Peace and Hope
and the everlasting Joy
such knowing
will bring.

God’s Love
is truly
a Many Splendored
Thing.

Goodnight.

             Let us dream the dream.

Heart-healthy diet: 8 steps to prevent heart disease
read more

Ready to start your heart-healthy diet? Here are eight tips to get you started.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Although you might know that eating certain foods can increase your heart disease risk, it’s often tough to change your eating habits. Whether you have years of unhealthy eating under your belt or you simply want to fine-tune your diet, here are eight heart-healthy diet tips. Once you know which foods to eat more of and which foods to limit, you’ll be on your way toward a heart-healthy diet.

 1. Control your portion size

How much you eat is just as important as what you eat. Overloading your plate, taking seconds and eating until you feel stuffed can lead to eating more calories than you should. Portions served in restaurants are often more than anyone needs.

Use a small plate or bowl to help control your portions. Eat larger portions of low-calorie, nutrient-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and smaller portions of high-calorie, high-sodium foods, such as refined, processed or fast foods. This strategy can shape up your diet as well as your heart and waistline.

Keep track of the number of servings you eat. A serving size is a specific amount of food, defined by common measurements such as cups, ounces or pieces. For example, one serving of pasta is 1/2 cup, or about the size of a hockey puck. A serving of meat, fish or chicken is about 2 to 3 ounces, or about the size and thickness of a deck of cards. Judging serving size is a learned skill. You may need to use measuring cups and spoons or a scale until you’re comfortable with your judgment.

2. Eat more vegetables and fruits

 Vegetables and fruits are good sources of vitamins and minerals. Vegetables and fruits are also low in calories and rich in dietary fiber. Vegetables and fruits contain substances found in plants that may help prevent cardiovascular disease. Eating more fruits and vegetables may help you eat less high-fat foods, such as meat, cheese and snack foods.

Featuring vegetables and fruits in your diet can be easy. Keep vegetables washed and cut in your refrigerator for quick snacks. Keep fruit in a bowl in your kitchen so that you’ll remember to eat it. Choose recipes that have vegetables or fruits as the main ingredients, such as vegetable stir-fry or fresh fruit mixed into salads.

Fruits and vegetables to choose Fruits and vegetables to limit
  • Fresh or frozen vegetables and fruits
  • Low-sodium canned vegetables
  • Canned fruit packed in juice or water
  • Coconut
  • Vegetables with creamy sauces
  • Fried or breaded vegetables
  • Canned fruit packed in heavy syrup
  • Frozen fruit with sugar added

3. Select whole grains

 Whole grains are good sources of fiber and other nutrients that play a role in regulating blood pressure and heart health. You can increase the amount of whole grains in a heart-healthy diet by making simple substitutions for refined grain products. Or be adventuresome and try a new whole grain, such as whole-grain farro, quinoa or barley.
Grain products to choose Grain products to limit or avoid
  • Whole-wheat flour
  • Whole-grain bread, preferably 100% whole-wheat bread or 100% whole-grain bread
  • High-fiber cereal with 5 g or more of fiber in a serving
  • Whole grains such as brown rice, barley and buckwheat (kasha)
  • Whole-grain pasta
  • Oatmeal (steel-cut or regular)
  • White, refined flour
  • White bread
  • Muffins
  • Frozen waffles
  • Corn bread
  • Doughnuts
  • Biscuits
  • Quick breads
  • Cakes
  • Pies
  • Egg noodles
  • Buttered popcorn
  • High-fat snack crackers

4. Limit unhealthy fats

 Limiting how much saturated and trans fats you eat is an important step to reduce your blood cholesterol and lower your risk of coronary artery disease. A high blood cholesterol level can lead to a buildup of plaques in your arteries, called atherosclerosis, which can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke.

The American Heart Association offers these guidelines for how much fat to include in a heart-healthy diet:

Type of fat Recommendation
Saturated fat Less than 7% of your total daily calories, or less than 14 g of saturated fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet
Trans fat Less than 1% of your total daily calories, or less than 2 g of trans fat if you follow a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet

The best way to reduce saturated and trans fats in your diet is to limit the amount of solid fats — butter, margarine and shortening — you add to food when cooking and serving. You can also reduce the amount of saturated fat in your diet by trimming fat off your meat or choosing lean meats with less than 10 percent fat.

You can also use low – fat substitutions when possible for a heart – healthy diet. For example, top your baked potato with low-sodium salsa or low-fat yogurt rather than butter, or use sliced whole fruit or low-sugar fruit spread on your toast instead of margarine.

You may also want to check the food labels of some cookies, crackers and chips. Many of these snacks — even those labeled “reduced fat” —  may be made with oils containing trans fats. One clue that a food has some trans fat in it is the phrase “partially hydrogenated” in the ingredient list.

When you do use fats, choose monounsaturated fats, such as olive oil or canola oil. Polyunsaturated fats, found in certain fish, avocados, nuts and seeds, also are good choices for a heart-healthy diet. When used in place of saturated fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats may help lower your total blood cholesterol. But moderation is essential. All types of fat are high in calories.

An easy way to add healthy fat (and fiber) to your diet is ground flaxseed. Flaxseeds are small brown seeds that are high in fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. Studies have found that flaxseeds may help lower cholesterol in some people. You can grind the seeds in a coffee grinder or food processor and stir a teaspoon of them into yogurt, applesauce or hot cereal.

Fats to choose Fats to limit
  • Olive oil
  • Canola oil
  • Vegetable and nut oils
  • Margarine, trans fat free
  • Cholesterol-lowering margarine, such as Benecol, Promise Activ or Smart Balance
  • Nuts, seeds
  • Avocados
  • Butter
  • Lard
  • Bacon fat
  • Gravy
  • Cream sauce
  • Nondairy creamers
  • Hydrogenated margarine and shortening
  • Cocoa butter, found in chocolate
  • Coconut, palm, cottonseed and palm-kernel oils

5. Choose low-fat protein sources

 Lean meat, poultry and fish, low-fat dairy products, and eggs are some of your best sources of protein. But be careful to choose lower fat options, such as skim milk rather than whole milk and skinless chicken breasts rather than fried chicken patties.

Fish is another good alternative to high-fat meats. And certain types of fish are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower blood fats called triglycerides. You’ll find the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in cold-water fish, such as salmon, mackerel and herring. Other sources are flaxseed, walnuts, soybeans and canola oil.

 Legumes — beans, peas and lentils — also are good sources of protein and contain less fat and no cholesterol, making them good substitutes for meat. Substituting plant protein for animal protein — for example, a soy or bean burger for a hamburger — will reduce your fat and cholesterol intake.
Proteins to choose Proteins to limit or avoid
  • Low-fat dairy products such as skim or low-fat (1%) milk, yogurt and cheese
  • Eggs
  • Fish, especially fatty, cold-water fish, such as salmon
  • Skinless poultry
  • Legumes
  • Soybeans and soy products, such as soy burgers and tofu
  • Lean ground meats
  • Full-fat milk and other dairy products
  • Organ meats, such as liver
  • Fatty and marbled meats
  • Spareribs
  • Hot dogs and sausages
  • Bacon
  • Fried or breaded meats

6. Reduce the sodium in your food

 Eating a lot of sodium can contribute to high blood pressure, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Reducing sodium is an important part of a heart-healthy diet. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends:
  • Healthy adults have no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day (about a teaspoon of salt)
  • People age 51 or older, African-Americans, and people who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease have no more than 1,500 mg of sodium a day
 Although reducing the amount of salt you add to food at the table or while cooking is a good first step, much of the salt you eat comes from canned or processed foods, such as soups and frozen dinners. Eating fresh foods and making your own soups and stews can reduce the amount of salt you eat.

If you like the convenience of canned soups and prepared meals, look for ones with reduced sodium. Be wary of foods that claim to be lower in sodium because they are seasoned with sea salt instead of regular table salt — sea salt has the same nutritional value as regular salt.

Another way to reduce the amount of salt you eat is to choose your condiments carefully. Many condiments are available in reduced-sodium versions, and salt substitutes can add flavor to your food with less sodium.

Low-salt items to choose High-salt items to avoid
  • Herbs and spices
  • Salt substitutes
  • Reduced-salt canned soups or prepared meals
  • Reduced-salt versions of condiments, such as reduced-salt soy sauce and reduced-salt ketchup
  • Table salt
  • Canned soups and prepared foods, such as frozen dinners
  • Tomato juice
  • Soy sauce

7. Plan ahead: Create daily menus

 You know what foods to feature in your heart-healthy diet and which ones to limit. Now it’s time to put your plans into action.

Create daily menus using the six strategies listed above. When selecting foods for each meal and snack, emphasize vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Choose lean protein sources and healthy fats, and limit salty foods. Watch your portion sizes and add variety to your menu choices.

 For example, if you have grilled salmon one evening, try a black-bean burger the next night. This helps ensure that you’ll get all of the nutrients your body needs. Variety also makes your meals and snacks more interesting.

8. Allow yourself an occasional treat

 Allow yourself an indulgence every now and then. A candy bar or handful of potato chips won’t derail your heart-healthy diet. But don’t let it turn into an excuse for giving up on your healthy eating plan. If overindulgence is the exception, rather than the rule, you’ll balance things out over the long term. What’s important is that you eat healthy foods most of the time.

 Incorporate these eight tips into your life, and you’ll find that heart-healthy eating is both doable and enjoyable. With planning and a few simple substitutions, you can eat with your heart in mind.

Friday:

We will meet at school
on Friday
from 8:30 a.m.
to 3:15 p.m.
and work with our Director,
George Rodriguez,
on our upcoming
Shakespeare production.

IMPORTANT  DATES:

May 5                 At School (Play rehearsal)
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

Lyrics/song texts are property and copyright of their owners and provided for educational purposes.

The magic and the wonder and the mystery that is this Life.

 

That’s All I Ask of You / Coping With Workplace Stress / Friday: At School (Shakespeare Play Rehearsal)

“We must know
that we have been created for greater things,
not just to be a number in the world,
not just to go for diplomas and degrees,
this work and that work.
We have been created in order
to Love
and to be Loved.”

–  Mother Teresa

God has been invited to come in.

My Dear Friends,
from this moment
Life can begin
again.

Imagine yourself
as another living Being.
And God
has been invited
to come in
and forgive you
of all your sin,
and rebuild the Life
that housed all your previous
days,
all the moments that for you
did exist.

             Life can begin again.

The first thought
that flies past you,
is that you cannot understand
what He is doing.

No.
No one can ever
really understand.

“Great is our Lord,
and abundant in power; 
his understanding is
beyond measure.”

Psalm 147:5

Because
the past
no longer exists.
Only tomorrow
is real again.

  The pain is no longer here to stay.

The pain,
from so many years,
that never
seemed to go away,
in one moment,
on one precious day,
is no longer
here to stay.

“For which cause we faint not;
but though our outward man perish,
yet the inward man is renewed
day by day.”
– 2 Corinthians 4:16
 .
God is preparing
a place for your
Heart.

Far
beyond forever,
will He stay
in Love with you.
For
He will never
not Love you.
And all
He asks in return,
is that you Love
Him.

Is this
not what we ask
of others
in Life?

“No more talk of darkness
Forget these wide eyed fears.
I’m here, nothing can harm you.
My words will warm and calm you.

Let me be your freedom.
Let daylight dry your tears.
I’m here, with you, beside you,
To guard you and to guide you

Say you Love me
Every waking moment.
Say you Love me
Oh, I do Love you
that’s all I ask of you.

Anywhere you go
let me go too.
Love me,
that’s all I ask of you.”
–  Andrew Lloyd Webber

Yes,
finding a way
to be,
is as simple as
“I Love You.
Please Love Me.”

Goodnight.

               I Love You.

Coping With Workplace Stress
by Diana Louise Carter
read more

 in Esperanza
(Hope to Cope with Anxiety and Depression)

click here for more

Taking steps to strengthen your resilience, plus seeking treatment if necessary, will help you handle cranky customers, toxic co-workers, and other on the job stressors.

After a really stressful day at work, Katie, an RN, spends a little extra drive time in her car.

“Once I leave the office, work stays here. I try absolutely my best not to take it home,” says Katie, who lives in Alabama. “Even if you have to drive around for a few minutes by yourself.”

That’s what professional counselors call a “calming ritual” – something that may come in especially handy for nurses like Katie, home health workers, bus drivers, social workers, and people employed in restaurants, real estate, personal services, and manufacturing.

Those are among occupations with the highest rates of depression, as ranked by two studies – one published in 2010, the other in 2014. Authors of the later study identified “frequent or difficult interactions” with the public or clients, high levels of stress, and low levels of physical activity as characteristics the jobs had in common.

No matter the profession, strains like cranky customers, uncivil bosses, unpredictable work schedules, unreasonable deadlines, and the 24/7 electronic tether of our mobile devices can challenge anyone’s well-being.

In the American Psychological Association’s 2012 annual Stress in America Survey, 65 percent of respondents listed work as their top source of life stress – but only 37 percent said they were “doing an excellent or very good job managing stress.”

Katie says hospital nursing is so demanding it’s sometimes hard to take a break to regroup.

“You’re the person who goes between the doctor and the patient,” she notes. “All of it kind of gets put on your shoulders. If it all goes wrong … nurses just catch most of the blame.”

Katie prefers to practice in a small clinic where the pace and workload are more comfortable. A case manager for an outpatient mental health and substance abuse program, she’s a fan of adult coloring books— “they’re actually very calming” – and journaling for stress relief.

CREATIVE CHANGES

Expert advice for dealing with job stress tends to fall into two categories: steps you can take at work, such as using all your allotted breaks or advocating for different duties, and steps you can take outside work to better your health and enrich your life satisfaction—getting more exercise, for example, or pursuing hobbies that make you happy.

Steven implemented both types of solutions when the demands of his brewery job in upstate New York contributed to an anxiety diagnosis in 2007.

Steven, 57, had to follow complicated and precise recipes to craft huge tanks of “malternatives” like fruit-flavored alcoholic beverages and hard lemonade. Once he was formally reprimanded for using an ingredient from a new supplier that hadn’t been certified yet, which meant the whole batch went down the drain. He found himself overthinking all the steps in making beer coolers.

He was able to implement one creative change in his work flow to reduce his second-guessing: He would line up ingredients before he started and as each was added, he’d remove it from the bench.

There were other aspects of the job came he couldn’t control, however. His schedule rotated through day, evening and night shifts—a documented risk factor in depression and anxiety. He would frequently be called away from one task to attend a process elsewhere in the brewery complex, which made it harder to meet his production deadlines. Cost-cutting layoffs shrank his department from five employees per shift to three.

To counterbalance on-the-job aggravations, Steven pursued nature photography on his own and with a meet-up group.

“Photography helps,” says Steven, who took a disability retirement last year due to a bum knee. “Taking walks, occupying yourself, looking around. Your mind isn’t replaying all that went on in work again.”

RESTORING RESILIENCE

The American Institute of Stress notes that job pressures in and of themselves may be less important than how individuals fit with the work environment. For example, there are people who thrive in pressure-cooker situations while others have a lower tolerance for overload.

What’s happening outside of work can make a difference, too. At times, life stressors plus job stressors may add up to more than an individual’s natural resilience can handle. That’s when buttressing your reserves with activities that strengthen your physical self (especially good sleep), reinforce a positive perspective (such as reframing problems), and dilute tension (yoga, anyone?) become even more important.

Allison got caught in a period of institutional upheaval shortly after starting a new job at a prestigious music conservatory in Rochester, New York.

“We had to downsize my department. I had to fire people to cut costs. I had to outsource services at the same time I was learning the job,” recalls Allison, who was hired to oversee publications and public affairs.

In her personal life, Allison was dealing with her mother’s declining health and her marriage was slowly unraveling. Diagnosed with depression, she worked with her doctor and therapist to come up with coping tools.

“My doctor suggested maybe doing art or exercising. I swam laps. I would sit quietly at night and listen to the radio and draw mandalas. I would paint,” says Allison.

As the environment at work worsened, Allison decided on a more radical solution: Leaving that job to look for opportunities where she could be self-employed.

The “take this job and shove it” approach may be the best option in some circumstances, but for many it feels like an impossible choice. Robert W. McLellarn, PhD, often counsels people who are stressed out because of their jobs.

“They feel like they have to keep going to keep the paycheck,” notes McLellarn, a licensed clinical psychologist in Portland, Oregon, who specializes in treating anxiety.

McLellarn says that taking some sort of action short of leaving a bad job can be a stress reliever. For example, pursue the skills or training needed to get a more fulfilling job. The goal is to feel less stuck.

“Even giving people some strategies, some ideas, some hope that this can change is rewarding,” says McLellarn.

 WORKPLACE ALLIES

Assuming clear guidelines from human resources and a sympathetic supervisor, negotiating accommodations can be an on-the-job option. Opinion varies on whether it’s wise to divulge mental health challenges, and a lot depends on an individual’s particular situation and comfort level.

Genella of Brandon, Manitoba, coaches individuals on managing stress and advises companies on how to establish “psychologically safe” workplaces through her consulting firm Partners in Discovery. Although more employers are recognizing the bottom-line benefits of reducing burnout, she acknowledges that ignorance and stigma haven’t disappeared.

“People understand if you have a cast on your leg, but if you’re stressed, people still think it’s a character flaw,” says Genella, who has dealt with depression and anxiety herself.

Similarly, Genella points out, people can see that someone with a broken leg needs an elevator to go between floors, but they may not know what sort of supports to offer for a person with depression or anxiety. 

Genella says Canadian law acknowledges addiction issues, but hasn’t codified accommodations for mental health.

Protections assured by the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act may come into play if symptoms interfere with job responsibilities, according to Job Accommodations Network, a program of the U.S. Department of Labor and academic and industry partners.

Lisa of Brooklyn found an ally when she went to work part-time as an admissions coordinator at a law school in New York City nine years ago. Lisa, 46, has lived with sometimes disabling anxiety since her teens. Her department head allowed her to switch around her schedule if a panic attack erupted on a day she was due in.

When Lisa feels overwhelmed at the office, she takes a bathroom break to practice deep breathing exercises. She also finds prayer calming.

Having a strong support network at home keeps Lisa fortified for work demands. She finds that in her husband and parents, who live in the same apartment building. Weekly visits with her beloved nephews, ages 5 years old and 4 months old, have become a vital tonic.

“I call them my sunshine boys,” she says. “They should just bottle babies and give that as depression medication.”

Genella, meanwhile, thrives on the “unconditional gratitude, acceptance and love” of her dog, Tucker.

“When you have those, you can’t have a stress response at the same time,” she asserts. “I suggest that a person find out: When you are stressed, what works for you?”

WORKPLACE STRESS: SWITCH GEARS

It’s important to leave work and all its worries behind once you get home. Creating a destressing ritual can help you move into a new frame of mind. That could be something as simple as changing into more comfortable clothes or having a cup of tea while reviewing the mail.

DOLLARS AND SENSE

If it’s not addressed, chronic work stress can have a negative impact on physical health, family relationships, and life satisfaction. It can tip vulnerable individuals into depression or anxiety, or trigger those already dealing with mental health challenges.

Quite apart from the personal toll, there’s a financial backlash for businesses. One widely quoted statistic puts the annual cost of job stress to the American economy at $300 billion.

That includes the estimated burden of accidents due to fatigue and inability to concentrate, employee turnover, and loss of productivity due to absenteeism and “presenteeism”—in attendance bodily but unable to work at normal capacity.

According to the Harvard Business Review, studies show that presenteeism due to chronic illnesses—including conditions like allergies and arthritis – costs employers two to three times more than direct medical care.

Looking specifically at depression in the workplace, the advocacy organization Mental Health American cites a figure of $51 billion annually in indirect costs to the U.S. economy.

In Canada, more than 30 percent of disability claims and 70 percent of disability costs can be traced to mental health issues, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada. However, such payouts may yield a rich payback.

In a 2009 survey of 3,000 Alberta workers found that 255 people (or nearly 10 percent) confirmed they’d had a depressive episode in the year before they were interviewed. Those who had received treatment were significantly more likely to report being able to function at a highly productive level at work compared to those who had not sought help

 TOXIC WORKPLACE ANTITOXINS

Sometimes job stress doesn’t come from the work itself but from the people you work with. In her book Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace, Christine Porath, PhD, chronicles the toll that a toxic workplace can take on employees and employers.

Productivity tends to decrease and work absences tend to increase. If workers burn out and leave, businesses face the expense of replacing them. People are likely to carry workplace stress home at the end of the day, with poisonous effects on their health and relationships.

Whether a single bout of yelling or constant “micro-aggressions” by a difficult supervisor, the effects “can stick with people for decades,” Porath says. “It takes a cognitive toll even if you just observe it.”

Minimizing face-to-face contact can be a legitimate strategy, such as steering clear of committee work with a co-worker who pushes your buttons. Some other recommendations:

For a reality check, discreetly ask co-workers whether they’re having similar problems. Try to evaluate where there’s an objective issue affecting everyone, like unreasonable deadlines or constant disrespect, or whether you are particularly reactive.

Try talking with your supervisor about specific behaviors and situations that are making you feel stressed. Some may welcome the feedback, others may react negatively.

If your supervisor is not receptive to your concerns, consider moving up the chain of command or turning to the human resources department or a union representative.

If unclear job expectations are creating stress, ask to work with your supervisor on developing written guidelines you can both agree upon

 FEEL THE BURN(OUT)

The Mayo Clinic lists these signs of job burnout:

  • Have you become cynical or critical at work?
  • Do you drag yourself to work and have trouble getting started once you arrive?
  • Have you become irritable or impatient with co-workers, customers or clients?
  • Do you lack the energy to be consistently productive?
  • Do you lack satisfaction from your achievements?
  • Do you feel disillusioned about your job?
  • Are you using food, drugs, or alcohol to feel better or to simply not feel?
  • Have your sleep habits or appetite changed?
  • Are you troubled by unexplained headaches, backaches or other physical complaints? 

  No one can ever really understand.

Friday:
Our plan to travel this Friday
has been postponed due to
inclement weather.
We will meet at school
on Friday
from 8:30 a.m.
to 3:15 p.m.
and work with our Director,
George Rodriguez,
on our upcoming
Shakespeare production.

IMPORTANT  DATES:

April 28             At School (Play rehearsal)
May 1                TUITION DUE for 2017-18
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

Lyrics/song texts are property and copyright of their owners and provided for educational purposes.

A Song Begins to Form / Surprising Mental Benefits of Clean Eating / Friday: at School (Shakespeare Rehearsal)

“Nighttime sharpens,
Heightens each sensation
Darkness stirs,
And wakes imagination
Silently the senses
Abandon their defenses

Slowly, gently
Night unfurls it’s Splendor
Grasp it, sense it
Tremulous and tender.”
Andrew Lloyd Webber, Charles Hart,
Richard Henry, Zachary Stilgoe

Remembering my precious “Kirby”.

There’s a whisper in the dark,
as Life comes to be
unafraid
to pierce the night
with imagination
and Love
and Light.
Unfolding in our dreams
we come to be,
where it seems,
there is no end
to what we can see.

Then a song begins to form
from deeply felt memories
that once were we,
echoing Love’s harmony
and joined in endless
flight
heard throughout the World
of our awareness,
on this precious
night.

And intoned we hear,
we shall never be alone,
as Hearts beat as one,
and again we find Love,

joined by cherished voices from the past,
and a deep Abiding Love
from Above.

“Oh Great Spirit,
Whose Voice I hear in the winds,
And whose Breath gives life to all the world,
hear me!
I am small and weak,
I need your strength and wisdom.
Let me walk in Beauty,
and make my eyes ever behold
the red and purple sunset.

Make my hands respect the things you have made
and my ears sharp to hear your voice.
Make me wise so that I may understand
the things you have taught my people.
Let me learn the lessons you have hidden
in every leaf and rock.
I seek strength,
not to be greater than my brother,
but to fight my greatest enemy –
myself.
Make me always ready to come to you
with clean hands and straight eyes.
So when Life fades,
as the fading sunset
my Spirit

may come to you without shame.”
– Native American Prayer
listen here

Such is
the Miracle of Love,
that it goes
on and on and on.
Not through time,
that may have never really existed,
or space,
not without end,
but through
Grace,
Everlasting to Everlasting.
Such is the Precious Love of
God.

“Grace, amazing Grace,
takes the powerful nature of Love
to the next level.
Grace is the width, and depth, and breadth of Love
reaching out, rippling across the ponds of time
to reach into the Hearts
of the lost and searching.
Grace is the freeing element of Love.”
Antwuan Malone
read more

I am rendered silent
when trying to fathom
the “Grace” of God’s Love.
How great is the Love of our Father?
Were we to spend our entire Life
trying to comprehend,
we could never grasp
its depth.

“Yea,
I have Loved thee

with an everlasting Love;
therefore with Loving kindness
have I drawn thee.”
– Jeremiah 31:3

Day after day
God’s Love
rises like the Dawn,
and always shines
upon you and me.

And through the dark of night
voices from the past
keep calling,
until
the Light of Dawn
chases away
every whisper
of our remembrances and imaginings
that begged to stay.

Annie and Alex, ages 8 and 5 (1992)

Old friends they are,
the rocks I tread upon –
I kick out from
under my bare feet.
Familiar they are,
these old friends
as comforting as the
ground,
belonging to me
as I to them.

My memory
seemingly seeps from the
Sacred soil
and back into me,
giving me
a sense of Peace,
finding some comfort
here.

 The silence is my teacher.
The calming air I breathe,
I find warm and inviting
and free.

Under the comforting warmth
of a beautiful spreading Tree,
I look to the Heavens
through the flickering,
whispering leaves.

This Sacred Place
I can never leave –
It never left me.
I belong here,
beneath the beautiful
canopy
of God’s Eternal Love.
What God provides
in Nature,
nurtures me.
It steals my Heart,
and leaves my Spirit
free.

I Pray
you will find
God’s Love
hidden deep within
the Forest
of your Heart.

“There is One Ultimate Loving Energy
that is present in all that exists.
You may call it whatever you are comfortable with:
God, Spirit, Source, the Great I Am, Allah, Yahweh, etc.
This is not a personality outside of us,
but rather a Presence within each of us.
We are inherently Spiritual Beings
having a Human experience.
We live in an abundant, unlimited Universe
and within us lies all the Wisdom, Love and Power
needed to create full, Joyous
prosperous lives.”
– Rev. Lee Wolak
Agape Center For Spiritual Living

Such moments
as I am with my Mother,
Nature,
truly magnify
the Miracle of Life
in me.

Goodnight

What God provides in Nature, nurtures me.

“Did you ever think
That we could be so close, like brothers.
The future’s in the air
I can feel it everywhere
Blowing with the wind of change.
Take me to the magic of the moment
On a glory night
Where the children of tomorrow dream away
in the wind of change
Walking down the street
Distant memories
Are buried in the past forever.”
Klaus Meine
listen here

The Surprising Benefits of Clean Eating

by Matthew Solan
read more

Eating unprocessed food is a great way to improve your overall diet, but proponents say it can also do great things for your mental health.

Erica learned the hard way how food affects her physical and mental health. Ten years ago, she worked in the high-pressure, go-go-go TV industry. Meals were devoured in minutes. Drinking two cans of Coke a day was the norm.

The work stress became overwhelming, and she soon left. But it wasn’t until later that she made the connection between what she ate and how it made her feel.

“I was not happy and my job at that time was no longer rewarding,” she says, “but I came to understand how my eating habits and choices had contributed to that.”

Erica realized that her food choices had aggravated her episodes of stress – and, conversely, that her stress had contributed to poor food choices.

“When I adopted a clean eating diet, where I cut out the processed and comfort foods, I immediately noticed a change not only in my mood, but how I reacted when things went wrong,” Erica says.

“No longer was my instinct to reach for the chips, soda, or ice cream.”

Less packaged, more whole

The term “clean eating” is trendy nowadays.

An entire magazine is devoted to the subject. From TV chef Curtis Stone and Whole Foods co-founder John Mackey to actresses Anne Hathaway and Jessica Alba, a slew of personalities and celebrities swear by clean eating.

But what does it mean exactly?

“Without all the excess sugar from processed foods and dairy, I had much less of the mental ups and downs that can happen when faced with daily stress.

“There are a lot of different interpretations, and no one fixed definition,” says

Pamela Fergusson, RD, PhD, a registered dietitian and consultant with Fresh Start Nutrition in Toronto.

“But generally, it refers to eating less processed foods and more whole foods.”

That means food in its natural or near-natural state, with minimal or no added chemicals, additives, or refined sugar. Ideally, what you eat should not be processed, or minimally processed, allowing it to retain high amounts of vitamins, minerals, and other essential nutrients.

One way to approach clean eating is to skip anything that comes in a box, can, or similar packaging.

But there are exceptions.

“For instance, beans come in cans that may add a little extra salt for flavor and preservation, but they are still beans, which are a nutritious whole food,” Fergusson notes.

You can ID processed foods as those that undergo changes from their natural state: think instant oatmeal instead of steel-cut oats, or French fries instead of whole potatoes.

Sound simple?

For the most part, it is.

“Clean eating encourages eating more of the right kind of foods without thinking about low-fat, low-calorie, or low-carb,” says Fergusson.

If you follow a particular eating plan – including a vegetarian, vegan or Paleo diet – you can still incorporate clean eating into your regimen. Just make a point to avoid processed staples.

For instance, vegetarians may enjoy frozen veggie burgers, but they don’t meet the guidelines of clean eating. Vegans may opt for soy cheese, but that’s often made with additives and preservatives.

Food-mood connection 

Clean eating can have a positive impact on your mood. Indeed, research is beginning to demonstrate how our food choices – not just what we eat, but what we don’t eat – can influence how we think and feel.

The scientific connection between our brain and food is an intertwining path, but here’s an abbreviated version:

When you get stressed, the body goes into fight-or-flight mode, releasing the hormones adrenal and cortisol to combat the stressful event. This reaction typically suppresses our appetite.

If stress persists, however, and you find yourself in a constant state of worry, anxiety, or prolonged exposure to stressful situations, these hormones overload the body and cause heightened inflammation and negative emotions.

“The worse someone feels, the more likely they will seek comfort,” explains Eva Selhub, MD, author of the books Your Health Destiny, The Love Response and Your Brain on Nature.

“Food can act as that comfort, which is why we call foods high in fat and sugar ‘comfort foods.’”

While it can make people feel better in the short term, comfort food serves only as a temporary fix, Selhub warns.

“You find yourself craving more feel-good foods to help fight the stress,” she says. “High amounts of these trans fats and high-sugar foods can further flame inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain, which creates more mental fog and depression.”

Healthy diet, enhanced mood

While your diet can contribute to stress, it may also control how your brain responds to them.

That’s why the goal of clean eating is to eliminate unhealthy “feel-good” food and replace it with natural choices that can actually promote greater brain health.

Studies have found that people who follow the Mediterranean diet, for example – which includes plenty of whole vegetables and fruits, unprocessed grains, fish, and other seafood – have a 25%-35% lower risk of depression compared with those who follow a typical “Western” diet high in processed and refined foods.

One reason that a diet abundant in natural-state foods benefits your brain and mood is that these foods contain high amounts of antioxidants, which have been shown to not only soothe inflammation and oxidative stress but help prevent it in the first place.

A “sweeter” outlook, naturally

If you battle unhealthy cravings as part of your stress, clean eating is a way to break free from your dependence.

Taylor, co-owner of St. Pete Strength and Conditioning in Florida, turned to clean eating when he became more dedicated to his weight-training regimen.

His approach: stick with foods close to their natural state, which helped eliminate high amounts of refined sugar in his diet.

Taylor says he noticed an almost instant change for the better.

“I’m detailed-oriented, I sweat the small stuff, and I get stressed easily. But the clean eating helps me stay more focused and not get sidetracked with distractions.”

Taylor pointed to cutting out sugar, a feeder of inflammation, as the main factor for his improved outlook.

“Without all the excess sugar from processed foods and dairy, I have much less of the mental ups and downs that can happen when faced with daily stress. I’m much better able to go with the flow,” he says.

Another advantage to clean eating is that it can expand your palate, so you’re not always stuck in a food rut.

“Clean eating encourages eating more of the right kind of foods without thinking about low-fat, low-calorie, or low-carb.”

“Clean eating is more about what you can have rather than what you can’t have,” says Rebecca Katz, MS, author of The Healthy Mind Cookbook.

“You’ll discover that when you eliminate a lot of processed ingredients, you’ll add more fruits, vegetables, and healthy fats that can turn into Technicolor meals full of bright greens, reds, and yellows.”

For her part, Erica discovered the many wonders of kale through clean eating.

“I learned that it was such a nutrient-rich food, and there were many ways to use it,” she says. “I use it in my breakfast smoothie, on lunchtime sandwiches, and as a side dish for dinner.”

Keep in mind that clean eating is designed to be flexible, so your healthy efforts will not collapse if you take a day off. If anything, the mental benefits of clean eating make it easier to rebound without guilt or stress.

“Now if I slip up, even over a few days, I’m aware of it and can more easily get back on track,” says Erica. “I don’t stress about it. That’s what’s so great about making positive change – it stays with you.”

Tips to Get Started

Here are some tips for making the move into clean eating:

Begin with breakfast. It’s a smaller meal and easier to prepare. Replace processed cereal with oatmeal, or a smoothie made with almond milk, greens, and frozen fruit.

Plan your meals. Organize and prep your meals for the week over the weekend. Have your fruits and vegetables chopped and stored in a container ready to go. It’s easier to reach into the fridge and grab what you need than to feel overwhelmed trying to prepare an entire meal from scratch.

Make a sweep of your kitchen. Get rid of processed foods lurking in your cupboards, refrigerator, and freezer. “This frees up space for you to add healthier alternatives that make cooking much more efficient,” says Katz.

Examples of “Clean Eating” Foods

The focus of clean eating is to consume more whole foods in their natural state and to avoid heavily processed foods.

When in doubt, read the label. “The ingredient list should be short and recognizable,” says Katz. “If you can’t say them, don’t eat them.”

Avoid anything with chemical-sounding names or phrases like “artificial coloring” and “flavors.” Here are a few examples of food staples that make up clean eating, according to Katz:

  • Healthy fats such as olive oil, grass-fed butter, and coconut oil
  • Fresh fruits – or canned, frozen, or dried fruit with no added sugar
  • Fresh vegetables – or canned or frozen vegetables with no added sauces or salt
  • Nuts like almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, and walnuts
  • Organic or vegetarian eggs
  • Unrefined grains, like whole-grain wheat bread and pasta, non-microwave popcorn, steel-cut oatmeal, quinoa, brown rice, and whole-wheat flour
  • Canned beans and legumes with little or no added salt (rinsing can reduce sodium by 35%)
  • Plain yogurt
  • Plain nut butters
  • Unsweetened almond or cashew milk
  • Organic or grass-fed meat, including beef and chicken
  • Fresh or frozen fish, including Pacific cod, salmon, and tilapia
  • Herbs and spices such as turmeric, basil, rosemary, cinnamon, and ginger

Cooking Tip

How you prepare your food can also help you eat clean. Stick with flash-cook methods like stir-frying and steaming, which lock in more vitamins and minerals. Avoid high-fat cooking techniques, like deep frying or stewing your food in animal or vegetable fats.

“Hold on to what is good,
even if it’s a handful of earth.
Hold on to what you believe,
even if it’s a tree that stands by itself.
Hold on to what you must do,
even if it’s a long way from here.
Hold on to your life,
even if it’s easier to let go.
Hold on to my hand,
even if I’ve gone away from you.”
Pueblo Indian Prayer

Beneath the beautiful canopy of God’s Eternal Love.

IMPORTANT  DATES:

April 28             Scarborough Renaissance Festival (Weather permitting)
May 1                TUITION DUE for 2017-18
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

Lyrics/song texts are property and copyright of their owners and provided for educational purposes.

Deep Peace / What Every Child Needs For Good Mental Health / Good Friday and Easter Holidays (Friday and Monday)

“Let the mountains talk
Let the rivers run
There is Wisdom here
There is much to learn
There is much to know
Much to understand
In this healing time
All across the land.

Through these darker days
On this narrow line
Help me find my way
Help me see the signs
I am not afraid
I am not alone
You have taught me well
You have brought me home.

To the rising sun
In each brand new day
In our own rebirth
In this healing time
Here on our Mother Earth.”
– John Denver

WE are made of the quiet earth,            and Sacred running waters.

Every
moment in time
can redefine
the mystery of
Life.
The deeper knowledge
of who we really are
can gently unfold
in our Sacred Heart,
our troubled mind.

Our thoughts and worries
trouble us so.
But when
our Hearts become
consciously present enough
in this precious moment,
we can recognize an opening
when it occurs,
and step through a door of awareness,
to clearly see
our mind is filled with distractions,
creating the illusions
of Life.

  The illusions of Life

Life
was never meant
to be lived
in the mind
alone,
but in the Sacred Heart
of God’s Love
for you
and me.

Every Sunrise
felt by your fragile Heart,
every thought
of another,
every Blessing your Life bestows
upon someone
less fortunate than you,
is a portal
to a redefining moment –
a moment that can again discern
and distinguish
YOU.

   A portal to a redefining moment

“Be still, my Soul;
the hour is hastening on
When we shall be forever with the Lord,
When disappointment, grief, and fear are gone,
Sorrow forgot, love’s purest Joys restored.
Be still, my Soul;
when change and tears are past,

All safe and Blessed
we shall meet at last.”

Catharine Amalia Dorothea von Schlegel, 1752

listen here

A beautiful Gaelic Blessing
has been set to music,
with lyrics based on the
Blessed Revelations of an
Irish Prayer.
This is one of the most peaceful and relaxing songs
that you will ever hear.
I invite you to
feel your way through the dark
CLICK HERE
(Deep Peace / arr. John Rutter)
and allow the simple and very powerful
message of this Prayer
to enter your precious
Heart.

Yes,
My Friends.
The Great Truths
are simple.
And so are
WE.

WE
are made of
the quiet Earth,
and Sacred running waters,
from the Whirling Flame
of God’s Love.
And one day
soon,
we shall surely return.

“Deep Peace”

“Deep peace of the running wave to you;
Deep peace of the flowing air to you;
Deep peace of the quiet earth to you;
Deep peace of the shining stars to you.
Deep peace of the gentle night to you;
Moon and stars pour their healing light on you;

Deep peace to you.
Deep peace of the sleeping stones to you;
Deep peace of the wandering wind to you;
Deep peace of the flock of stars to you;
Deep peace, deep peace.
Pure red of the whirling flame to you;
Pure white of the silver moon to you;
Pure green of the emerald grass to you;

Deep peace.
Deep peace of the running wave to you;
Deep peace of the flowing air to you;
Deep peace of the quiet earth
to you;

Deep peace, deep peace.”

Every Sunrise felt by your Sacred Heart

“For the weak and broken down,
For the lost Souls not yet found,
For the hopeful left in doubt.

Peace to you.
Peace.
The peace of Christ to you.

For the wounded child of man.
For the poor who need a hand.
For the humble who understand.

Peace to you.
Peace.”
– Marc Byrd

I wish you
Peace
my Friend.
The deep Peace
that comes from
God’s Love
for you.

Goodnight.

What Every Child Needs For Good Mental Health

Mental Health America (MHA) permits electronic copying and sharing of all portions of its website.

read more

It is easy for parents to identify their child’s physical needs: nutritious food, warm clothes when it’s cold, bedtime at a reasonable hour. However, a child’s mental and emotional needs may not be as obvious. Good mental health allows children to think clearly, develop socially and learn new skills.  Additionally, good friends and  encouraging words from adults are all important for helping children develop self confidence, high self-esteem, and a healthy emotional outlook on life.

A child’s physical and mental health are both important.

Basics for a child’s good physical health:

  • Nutritious food
  • Adequate shelter and sleep
  • Exercise
  • Immunizations
  • Healthy living environment

Basics for a child’s good mental health:

  • Unconditional love from family
  • Self-confidence and high self-esteem
  • The opportunity to play with other children
  • Encouraging teachers and supportive caretakers
  • Safe and secure surroundings
  • Appropriate guidance and discipline

Give children unconditional love.

Love, security and acceptance should be at the heart of family life.  Children need to know that your love does not depend on his or her accomplishments.

Mistakes and/or defeats should be expected and accepted. Confidence grows in a home that is full of unconditional love and affection.

Nurture children’s confidence and self-esteem.

  • Praise Them – Encouraging children’s first steps or their ability to learn a new game helps them develop a desire to explore and learn about their surroundings. Allow children to explore and play in a safe area where they cannot get hurt.  Assure them by smiling and talking to them often. Be an active participant in their activities. Your attention helps build their self-confidence and self-esteem.
  • Set Realistic Goals – Young children need realistic goals that match their ambitions with their abilities. With your help, older children can choose activities that test their abilities and increase their self-confidence.
  • Be Honest – Do not hide your failures from your children. It is important for them to know that we all make mistakes. It can be very re-assuring to know that adults are not perfect.
  • Avoid Sarcastic Remarks – If a child loses a game or fails a test, find out how he or she feels about the situation. Children may get discouraged and need a pep talk. Later, when they are ready, talk and offer assurance.
  • Encourage children – To not only strive to do their best, but also to enjoy the process. Trying new activities teaches children about teamwork, self-esteem and new skills.

Make time for play!

Encourage Children to Play

To children, play is just fun. However, playtime is as important to their development as food and good care. Playtime helps children be creative, learn problem-solving skills and learn self-control.  Good, hardy play, which includes running and yelling, is not only fun, but helps children to be physically and mentally healthy.

Children Need Playmates

Sometimes it is important for children to have time with their peers.  By playing with others, children discover their strengths and weaknesses, develop a sense of belonging, and learn how to get along with others. Consider finding a good children’s program through neighbors, local community centers, schools, or your local park and recreation department.

Parents Can be Great Playmates

Join the fun! Playing Monopoly or coloring with a child gives you a great opportunity to share ideas and spend time together in a relaxed setting.

Play for Fun

Winning is not as important as being involved and enjoying the activity. One of the most important questions to ask children is “Did you have fun?’’ not “Did you win?”

In our goal-oriented society, we often acknowledge only success and winning. This attitude can be discouraging and frustrating to children who are learning and experimenting with new activities. It’s more important for children to participate and enjoy themselves.

TV use should be monitored

Try not to use TV as a “baby-sitter” on a regular basis.  Be selective in choosing television shows for children. Some shows can be educational as well as entertaining.

School should be fun!

Starting school is a big event for children. “Playing school” can be a positive way to give them a glimpse of school life.

Try to enroll them in a pre-school, Head Start, or similar community program which provides an opportunity to be with other kids and make new friends. Children can also learn academic basics as well as how to make decisions and cope with problems.

Provide appropriate guidance and instructive discipline

Children need the opportunity to explore and develop new skills and independence. At the same time, children need to learn that certain behaviors are unacceptable and that they are responsible for the consequences of their actions.

As members of a family, children need to learn the rules of the family unit. Offer guidance and discipline that is fair and consistent. They will take these social skills and rules of conduct to school and eventually to the workplace.

Suggestions on Guidance and Discipline

  • Be firm, but kind and realistic with your expectations. Children’s development depends on your love and encouragement.
  • Set a good example. You cannot expect self-control and self-discipline from a child if you do not practice this behavior.

Criticize the behavior, not the child.  It is best to say, “That was a bad thing you did,” rather than “You are a bad boy or girl.”

Avoid nagging, threats and bribery. Children will learn to ignore nagging, and threats and bribes are seldom effective.

Give children the reasons “why” you are disciplining them and what the potential consequences of their actions might be.

Talk about your feelings.  We all lose our temper from time to time. If you do “blow your top,” it is important to talk about what happened and why you are angry.  Apologize if you were wrong!

Remember, the goal is not to control the child, but for him or her to learn self-control.

Provide a safe and secure home.

It’s okay for children to feel afraid sometimes.  Everyone is afraid of something at some point in their life. Fear and anxiety grow out of experiences that we do not understand.

If your children have fears that will not go away and affect his or her behavior, the first step is to find out what is frightening them. Be loving, patient and reassuring, not critical. Remember:  the fear may be very real to the child.

Signs of Fear

Nervous mannerisms, shyness, withdrawal and aggressive behavior may be signs of childhood fears. A change in  normal eating and sleeping patterns may also signal an unhealthy fear. Children who “play sick” or feel anxious regularly may have some problems that need attention.

Fear of school can occur following a stressful event such as moving to a new neighborhood, changing schools, or after a bad incident at school.

Children may not want to go to school after a period of being at home because of an illness.

When to seek help

Parents and family members are usually the first to notice if a child has problems with emotions or behavior. Your observations with those of teachers and other caregivers may lead you to seek help for your child. If you suspect a problem or have questions, consult your pediatrician or contact a mental health professional.

Warning Signs

The following signs may indicate the need for professional assistance or evaluation:

  • Decline in school performance
  • Poor grades despite strong efforts
  • Regular worry or anxiety
  • Repeated refusal to go to school or take part in normal children’s activities
  • Hyperactivity or fidgeting
  • Persistent nightmares
  • Persistent disobedience or aggression
  • Frequent temper tantrums
  • Depression, sadness or irritability

Learn more about specific mental health conditions and children

Where to seek help

Information and referrals regarding the types of services that are available for children may be obtained from:

  • Mental health organizations, hotlines and libraries
  • Other professionals such as the child’s pediatrician or school counselor
  • Other families in the community
  • Family network organizations
  • Community-based psychiatric care
  • Crisis outreach teams
  • Education or special education services
  • Family resource centers and support groups
  • Health services
  • Protection and advocacy groups and organizations
  • Self-help and support groups

Other Resources

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
www.aacap.org

Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health
Phone: 703-684-7710
www.ffcmh.org

Family Support America
Phone: 312-338-0900

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
Phone 800-695-0285
www.nichcy.org

National Association of School Psychologists
Phone 301-657-0270
www.naspweb.org

What Every Child Needs for Good Mental Health is one in a series of pamphlets on children and teen mental health.

Other Mental Health America titles include:

  • Teen Eating Disorders
  • Teen Depression and Suicide
  • Teen Self-esteem Feeling Good About Yourself
  • Teen Stress: A Guide to Surviving Stress

SOURCES

“Facts for Families,” America Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
“Children’s and Adolescent’s Mental Health,” US Dept. of Health and Human Services

IMPORTANT  DATES:

April 14 & 17    (Friday and Monday) Good Friday and Easter Holidays
April 28             Scarborough Renaissance Festival (Weather permitting)
May 1                TUITION DUE for 2017-18
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.


Lockstep and Fits ALL? / Monarchs and Milkweed / Nutrition / Tea and Dementia / Equipping the Storm Shelter / Friday: At School (Shakespeare Production)

“I long for the day
when the statement,
‘Our God is Love,
our race is Human,
and our religion is Oneness,’
is more than the musings
of my mind,
but is the Creed of the Heart
of the Human family.”
– Rev. Jim Rosemergy

Monarch butterfly / Photo by Mark Musselman / National Audubon Society / USFWS

The annual migration of North America’s
Monarch Butterfly is a unique phenomenon.
The Monarch is the only butterfly
known to make a two-way migration as birds do,
flying as far as 3,000 miles.
The farthest ranging Monarch recorded
traveled 265 miles in one day,
and they weigh less than a gram

Every backyard can become an oasis
for Monarchs. You can engage in planting
or preserving native milkweed plants
necessary for their survival.
Our school always preserves milkweed plants
for our visiting Monarch friends.

Why don’t you join us?

By the way,
Milkweed is the larval host for the Monarch
and is considered nectar plants for many different
butterfly species found feeding from the flower.

We are located directly in the migratory path
of the magnificent Monarch Butterflly.


Few are aware
that the educational system
we have in place today
was adopted from the program
put into place by
Catherine the Great of Russia in
1899
to produce good soldiers, obedient factory workers,
and citizens who would not question authority
and dutifully pay their taxes.

         Catherine the Great                Credit: Dmitry Levitzky [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This curriculum model
has inevitably led to a
“one size fits all”
mentality
and a lockstep method
of advancement.
It emphasizes rote memorization
and the passing of tests
over critical thinking skills,
the development of creativity,
fostering and nurturing
a Love of Learning,
and the acceleration of study
in innate areas of
higher awareness.

The lockstep platform forces learners
to proceed at the same pace.
It requires fewer instructors,
far less management and assessment
and is much more easily managed
than self-paced programs.

The ‘Iiwi is one of the endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper species. Photo by Kahn, Noah/USFWS

A primary disadvantage of lockstep placement
is that the pace is set for average learners.
However,
there are no average learners.
It is statistically improbable
that a group of children will all be
in the third grade, second month,
first week and second day
in all elementary subjects
and progress day after day,
year after year,
at the same pace.

And the design of the curriculum,
placement within the program,
as well as the assessment tools utilized,
are all highly subjective.

Every child is different.
They all have special learning requirements
and different pacing needs
within different subject areas.

No,
there are no average learners.
Everything in Life
follows the bell-shaped curve
of probability.
And with time,
one’s position on this curve
becomes fluid and flexible,
especially within a broad range
of subject areas
and learning disciplines and interests
and strengths and weaknesses.

Endangered Bay Checkerspot butterfly / photo by John Clecker / USFWS

And the linear concept
of directing virtually every educational goal
toward achievement on a singular event assessment
always results in validity concerns.

“Teaching to a test becomes stifling
for teachers and students,
far from the inspiring, adaptive education
which most benefits students.
Our greatly accelerating world needs graduates
who are trained to address
tough situations with innovation,
ingenuity, entrepreneurship, and a capacity
for mobilizing collaboration and cooperation.”
– Jonathan Lash, President, Hampshire College

Goodnight.

Island marble butterfly / Photo by Miskelly, James / USFWS

Nutrition is important
in both cancer and heart disease prevention.
Eating a diet RICH in
fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free and
low-fat dairy foods, and seafood

has been associated with a decrease
in cardiovascular disease and cancer.”

The disease-fighting elements in a good diet are:
Fiber, which aids weight control
and lowers heart and cancer risks,
Antioxidants, which fight disease-causing cell damage.

Omega-3 fatty acids,
which lower blood pressure

among other benefits.”

    – Michael LeFevre, MD

Zebra Swallowtail / Photo by Hagerty, Ryan / USFWS

When a severe storm spawns tornadoes,
proper shelter is the key to staying alive.

it is crucial to keep the shelter equipped
with the right materials to stay safe.

“People should take every warning seriously,”
AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.
“Warnings are issued because there is good scientific data
showing either a storm producing damaging winds,
hail or a tornado,
or is capable of doing so.”

Having a plan in place before severe weather strikes
will avoid any last-second panic or confusion.
It also ensures that everyone will be prepared
to handle a storm and its aftermath.

Lucinda Parker, public information officer
at the Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, said.

A basic kit includes water, nonperishable food,
a first aid kit, a flashlight and batteries.
(Friends: have an additional unopened package of new batteries)
If sheltering pets or infants,
keep a supply of baby formula, diapers and pet food
in the kit as well.

“We urge people to keep a kit at home,
in their car, and if they do have a storm shelter,
that would be a good place for a kit, as well,” Parker said.

“If you ever find happiness
by hunting for it,
you will find it,
as the old woman did
her lost spectacles,
safe on her own nose
all the time.”
Josh Billings

Other essential items to have on hand, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency:

1. Battery-powered radio
2. Pillows, blankets and other bedding (pillows can also be used as protection from flying debris)
3. Essential documents (birth certificate copies, insurance policies, etc.)
4. Toilet paper and bags for sanitation
5. Personal sanitation items (toothbrush, deodorant, etc.)
6. Whistle (to signal for help if trapped)
7. A change of clothes per person
8. Close-toe shoes and extra socks per person (especially if there is debris to tread over)
9. Wrench or pliers (to turn off utilities)
10. Dust mask or cotton t-shirt (to filter the air)
read more

Little wood satyr / Photo by Barnes, Dr. Thomas G. / USFWS

Drinking Tea Cuts Your Risk of Dementia in Half
from our friends at the Underground Health Reporter
read more

A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging
found that drinking tea can cut your risk of cognitive impairment in half. For individuals with a genetic risk of developing Alzheimer’s, the reduction of risk could be lowered by as much as 86%!

Benefits associated with tea consumption come from the numerous bioactive compounds found in tea leaves, including:

Catechins
Theaflavins
Thearubigins
L-theanine

The compounds exhibited anti-inflammatory
and antioxidant properties,
as well as additional bioactive properties
that appear to prevent vascular damage to the brain
and neurodegeneration.

Truly I tell you, anyone who will not receive the Kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it.”  – Luke 18:15-17

 Friday:
We will meet at school (8:30 a.m. – 3:15 p.m.)
The day will be dedicated to work on our
Shakespeare production
with Director
George Rodriguez.

IMPORTANT  DATES:
April 7               At School (preparation for Shakespeare production)
April 14 & 17    (Friday and Monday) Good Friday and Easter Holidays
April 28             Scarborough Renaissance Festival (Weather permitting)
May 1                TUITION DUE for 2017-18
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Tiger swallowtail / Photo by Dr.Thomas G. Barnes / USFWS

 Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

 

More Fragile Than We Think / Affirmative Prayer / Friday: At School (Shakespeare Production)

“Love is a fruit
in season at all times,

and within reach
of every hand.”

Mother Teresa

J D

          Slowly, gently, soft as early morning Light

Unbeknown
to the population at large,
Suicide
is the second leading cause of death
for college students.

Read more.

My Friends,
there is absolutely NOTHING
worth more than the precious Life
of your child.
Not a rule, or a law, an academic standard,
highly subjective grades on a report card,
an unrealistic expectation,
a dream, a hope, a cause,
pride, a possession, money,
a care,
or any possible concern.

In the simplicity of logic
and language:
without Life,
none of these things
exist.

“Life
is a lot more fragile than we think.
So you should treat others in a way
that leaves no regrets.”
Haruki Murakami

$ loan

Without Life, none of these things exist.

There is nothing more Beautiful
than YOU.
Nothing is more delicate
than your feelings,
nothing more fragile
than your being,
nothing more precious,
or Sacred,
than Life.

Slowly,
gently,
soft as early morning Light,
Life unfurls its
Splendor.

Please know
that every word you say
to your child
each day,
is a letter
read to the Heart
out loud.
You tell the story
of your Life
with every look,
every smile,
every word.

Slowly,
gently,
softly,
unfurl the Splendor
of your Heart,
the Heart that secretly
possesses you.

The beautiful music of your Life
is meant to be
listened to
by everyone
that passes by.
And it is
intently heard
by your child.

“Love is a song that never ends.
Life may be swift and fleeting.
Hope may die.
Yet Love’s beautiful music

Comes each day
like the dawn”.

Frank Churchill

 9 9 9

                     Unfurl the Splendor.

Go deeply within yourself.
In the quiet
of this moment,
that is possessed
of every moment in time,
and let the Dream,
that is the beauty of Life,
begin.

Your Love
is
Life.
And the Love
of God,
is YOU.

Even when
you are not there,
your child
needs to hear you say,
“I Love YOU so much”,
and to still feel
the warmth of your
embrace,
to know,
“you are
always
on my mind.”

How many times,
and in how many ways,
did you say
“I Love You”
today?

 4 3

        Nothing more precious than Life.

The time
you take to do
the “little” things,
to let a child know
of the deep and abiding Love
in your Heart,
is time
you will never
regret,
as your brief Journey
nears its
end.

Goodnight.

5 $ 9

   Every word is a letter read to the Heart.

Affirmative Prayer

If we think of God
as something apart
from that which lives and moves
and has Its being where we are,
then we are certain to believe ourselves
to be disconnected
from this Infinite Presence.
If we know God
as an Indwelling Presence,
our Prayer is naturally addressed
to this Presence
within us.
– Ernest Holmes

J r $

Nothing more precious.

“Our relationship to God
is not static, fixed. 
Our relationship with God,
which we call “faith,”
is best characterized as a journey,
a movement outward in trust that God
leads us by the bonds of
Love.”

– Judi Harbin

 Friday:
We will meet at school (8:30 a.m. – 3:15 p.m.)
The day will be dedicated to work on our
Shakespeare production
with Director
George Rodriguez.

IMPORTANT  DATES:
March 31           At School (preparation for Shakespeare production)
April 7               Tour of Fire Station and Fire Academy
April 14 & 17    (Friday and Monday) Good Friday and Easter Holidays
April 28             Scarborough Renaissance Festival (Weather permitting)
May 1                TUITION DUE for 2017-18
May 15 & 16      Shakespeare Production at Stage West Theater
May 22 – 26       Adventure Trip
May 26               Last Day of Semester.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976,
allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

$ $ $

                          Life unfurls its Splendor.