The River of Life / Supplements for Diabetes / WEDNESDAY trip: Modern Art Museum

 

The River of Life
swiftly flows and evermore
down a slope
that is steep
and seldom yielding
to our desires.
But Blessings deep
are carved into the marrow
of tomorrow.

Thus
we are molded
into that which
survives
and Time will keep.

      Carved into the marrow of tomorrow.

As we borrow Today
from our children,
beautiful moments are forged
into Wonder,
and then
we sleep.

And when
you are wide awake
in the middle of a Dream,
when the Spirit emerges
from the physical Being,
to freely roam
Ethereal space,
the rhythm of Life
is locked in place
with Cosmic Time
that leaves no
trace.

Yes,
when we are
far, far away
in Dreams
that tell us who we really are,
we see
not just the the poetic imagination,
but the Spiritual,
not only the day
in night,
but what may be,
second sight.

The cycle of Dreams
night after night,
like the breathing
of the Oceans,
the swelling of the
Tides,
is much like
our emotions,
and the Seasons
of the Heart.

Do not
depart
from your precious
Dreams.

Goodnight.

             Like the breathing of the Oceans.

On Wednesday, April 18, 2018
we will meet at the

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
3200 Darnell Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
817.738.9215
see details below:

                      Café Modern

Herbs and Supplements for Diabetes

Medically reviewed by
George Krucik, MD, MBA
by The Healthline Editorial Team
read more

Using Supplements for Diabetes Treatment
It is always best to let the foods you eat provide your vitamins and minerals. However, more and more people are turning to alternative medicines and supplements. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics are more likely to use supplements than those without the disease.

Supplements should not be used to replace standard diabetes treatment. Doing so can put your health at risk.

It is important to talk to your doctor before using any supplements. Some of these products can interfere with other treatments and medications. Just because a product is natural does not mean it is safe to use.

A number of supplements have shown promise as diabetes treatments. These include the following:
Cinnamon
Chinese medicine has been using cinnamon for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. It has been the subject of numerous studies to determine its effect on blood glucose levels. A 2011 study has shown that cinnamon, in whole form or extract, helps lower fasting blood glucose levels. More studies are being done, but cinnamon is showing promise for helping to treat diabetes.

Chromium
Chromium is an essential trace element. It is used in the metabolism of carbohydrates. However, research on the use of chromium for diabetes treatment is mixed. Low doses are safe for most people, but there is a risk that chromium could make blood sugar go too low. High doses also have the potential to cause kidney damage.

Vitamin B-1
Vitamin B-1 is also known as thiamine. Many people with diabetes are thiamine deficient. This may contribute to some diabetes complications. Low thiamine has been linked to heart disease and blood vessel damage.

Thiamine is water-soluble. It has difficulty getting into the cells where it’s needed. However, benfotiamine, a supplemental form of thiamine, is lipid-soluble. It more easily penetrates cell membranes. Some research suggests that benfotiamine can prevent diabetic complications. However, other studies have not shown any positive effects.

Alpha-Lipoic Acid
Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is a potent antioxidant.
Some studies suggest it may:
• reduce oxidative stress
• lower fasting blood sugar levels
• decrease insulin resistance
However, more research is needed. Furthermore, ALA needs to be taken with caution, as it has the potential to lower
blood sugar levels to dangerous levels.

Bitter Melon
Bitter melon is used to treat diabetes-related conditions in countries like Asia, South America, and others. There is a lot of data on its effectiveness as a treatment for diabetes in animal and lab studies.
However, there is limited human data on bitter melon. There are not enough clinical studies on human. The human studies currently available are not of high quality.

Green Tea
Green tea contains polyphenols, which are antioxidants.
The main antioxidant in green tea is known as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). Laboratory studies have suggested that EGCG may have numerous health benefits including:
• lower cardiovascular disease risk
• prevention of type 2 diabetes
• improved glucose control
better insulin activity
Studies on diabetic patients have not shown health benefits. However, green tea is generally considered safe.

Resveratrol
Resveratrol is a chemical found in wine and grapes. In animal models, it helps prevent high blood sugar. Animal studies have also shown that it can reduce oxidative stress. However, human data is limited. It is too soon to know if supplementation helps with diabetes.

Magnesium
Magnesium is an essential nutrient. It helps regulate blood pressure. It also regulates insulin sensitivity. Supplemental magnesium may improve insulin sensitivity in diabetics.
A high magnesium diet may also reduce the risk of diabetes. Researchers have found a link between higher magnesium intake, lower rates of insulin resistance, and diabetes.

Copyright Disclaimer – Section 107 – Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is permitted by copyright statute. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of “fair use”.

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